Ginger Miso Skirt Steak with Brussels Sprout Slaw

Ginger Miso Steak with Brussels Sprout Slaw | Cravings & Crumbs

I don’t know about you guys, but I am fall flavor-ed out.  Sure, the sage, apple cider, cinnamon, and multiple batches of pumpkin bread were fun at first.  But after a while the flavors become monotonous, one dish blending into another on the Thanksgiving plate.  What I really wanted after that big feast was 1) beef, because after three days of Thanksgiving leftovers I don’t want another bite of poultry, and 2) something relatively healthy and preferably packed with veggies that haven’t seen any butter or cream.  Enter, this ginger miso skirt steak with a brussels sprout slaw.

Ginger Miso Steak with Brussels Sprout Slaw | Cravings & Crumbs

The steak is literally packed with flavor!  We start with miso and soy sauce for umami.  Red miso is more intense than yellow or white miso – we need the miso to be intense enough to stand up to the steak and the rest of our seasonings.  Then we grate a bunch of fresh ginger and garlic with some toasted sesame oil to pump up the flavor even more.  Lastly we add a big squirt of sriracha for some heat and a little honey for sweetness.

Ginger Miso Steak with Brussels Sprout Slaw | Cravings & Crumbs

The slaw is crunchy and fresh and a perfect complement to the steak.  If you’ve never had shredded Brussels sprouts, you’re missing out.  They have all the good qualities that cabbage has, but they have a lower water content which means that they won’t release a lot of water and dilute your dressing and they’ll stay crunchy longer!  

Ginger Miso Steak with Brussels Sprout Slaw | Cravings & Crumbs

Pro tip: if you have any leftovers or you can’t go a meal without carbs they’re really delicious chopped up in a taco!

Ginger Miso Steak with Brussels Sprout Slaw
Serves 4
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Steak
  1. 1 lb skirt steak, cut into 4 portions
  2. ⅓ c. light soy sauce
  3. 2 ½ T. red miso paste
  4. 1 T. toasted sesame oil
  5. 1 T. honey
  6. 1 T. sriracha
  7. 3 T. water
  8. 1 T. fresh ginger, grated
  9. 5 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
  10. peanut or other neutral oil to cook
Slaw
  1. 1 lb brussels sprouts (4 c. shredded)
  2. 1 c. cherry tomatoes, halved
  3. 1 medium carrot, shaved into ribbons
  4. 1 avocado, diced
  5. 1 serrano pepper, thinly sliced
  6. ¼ medium red onion, thinly sliced
  7. ½ c. cilantro, chopped
  8. 2 T. light soy sauce
  9. 2 T. rice wine vinegar
  10. 2 t. lime juice
  11. 1 t. honey
  12. 1 t. fresh ginger, minced
Instructions
  1. Mix all ingredients for the marinade in a small bowl or measuring cup. Add marinade and steak to a zip-top bag and allow to marinate for at least 30 minutes or up to overnight.
  2. In a large bowl add the shredded brussels sprouts, tomatoes, carrot, avocado, pepper, onion, and cilantro and toss to combine.
  3. In a small bowl combine the ingredients for the slaw dressing.
  4. Remove steak from marinade and pat mostly dry with paper towels.
  5. Heat a grill pan (or a real grill!) over high heat. Add 1-2 T oil to pan and add steak pieces in a single layer. Allow to sear without moving for 3-5 minutes per side for medium rare to medium.
  6. Remove to a plate and allow to rest for 5-10 mins.
  7. While steak is resting toss the slaw with the vinaigrette.
  8. Slice steak thinly against the grain and serve with slaw.
Cravings & Crumbs http://www.cravingsandcrumbs.com/
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The Best Garlic Bread

The Best Garlic Bread | Cravings & Crumbs

Garlic bread.  You might be wondering why we even need a recipe for garlic bread.  Mix garlic with butter, spread it on bread, bake it.  Done.  Well, despite being so straightforward I often get well accomplished home cooks asking me how to make it.  Heck, I treat myself to it so rarely that I often question myself when I make it.  So I made my ideal version of garlic bread and wrote everything out so that next time I want to make the best garlic bread ever I can just look back at this recipe!

The Best Garlic Bread | Cravings & Crumbs

The first step to the best garlic bread is to start with good bread.  I like to grab a loaf of ciabatta because once you’re done baking it the edges get a nice crunch to them, but because of the large holes in the bread’s structure is stays soft in the middle.  The second secret is to let the garlic infuse into the butter for at least 30 minutes, but preferably longer to maximize and evenly distribute the garlicky-ness.

The Best Garlic Bread | Cravings & Crumbs

The final step is baking.  We start the garlic bread at a pretty standard heat to melt the butter and toast the bottom slightly, but the trick is to finish it off with the broiler so you can get exactly the amount of crispiness that you want.  Not only does it speed up the process, but it ensures that the inside of the bread doesn’t dry out too much.

The Best Garlic Bread | Cravings & Crumbs

Listen, it’s hard to go wrong with garlic bread unless you burn it to a crisp, but this is just my method to maximize the best parts.  So use whatever bread you prefer and add any extra seasonings that you like.  I guarantee there won’t be any leftovers!  There never are when it comes to garlic bread…

The Best Garlic Bread | Cravings & Crumbs

And if you’re looking for a good recipe to serve with this garlic bread, hop on over to my everyday meatballs and sauce recipe.  The sauce is cooked with a cup of red wine, so it’s a great excuse to crack open a bottle and have a glass with dinner.

The Best Garlic Bread
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Ingredients
  1. 1 loaf ciabatta or french bread
  2. 1 stick salted butter, softened
  3. 4 cloves garlic, minced
  4. 2 T. chopped fresh parsley (or 2 t. dried)
  5. ½ t. garlic powder
  6. ¼ t. dried basil
Instructions
  1. Mix butter, garlic, parsley, garlic powder, and basil in a small bowl. Allow flavors to marry for at least 30 minutes and up to 2 weeks (in the refrigerator).
  2. Preheat oven to 350° F.
  3. Cut bread in half lengthwise and spread both halves evenly with garlic butter. Lay bread, cut side up on a baking tray. Bake 10-12 mins to melt the butter, then broil briefly to crispy and brown the bread to your liking. Do not walk away!! Stay right near the oven and check every 30 seconds or so, as it will only take a minute or two.
  4. Allow to cool slightly, then cut into 1-inch pieces.
Cravings & Crumbs http://www.cravingsandcrumbs.com/
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Everyday Meatballs and Sauce

Everyday Meatballs and Sauce | Cravings & Crumbs After suffering through the final late-October heat wave of summer, we finally have a fall chill in the air and it has me dreaming of comfort food!  Aside from a perfectly roast chicken there’s nothing more comforting to me than a big bowl of tender meatballs in tomato sauce.  It wasn’t always that way though.  As a kid I was pretty indifferent to meatballs.  I liked them, but I wouldn’t go out of my way to request them.  No, like most things, I started liking them best once I made them for myself and got to research and tweak the recipe to get them exactly how I wanted. Everyday Meatballs and Sauce | Cravings & Crumbs It was a meatball starter at a local restaurant that spurred my current meatball obsession.  Made with high quality ingredients and cooked in a wood burning oven they were amazing!  And so I started trying to figure out how to get as close as possible to those meatballs at home, but I also wanted them to be something that was easy and accessible to make so it would be realistic even for a weeknight.  That meant no wood burning oven, no deep frying, and no veal.  Although many recipes use veal and surely it would make the meatballs softer, including veal in my go-to recipe would mean making a stop at a specialty market which just isn’t going to happen as often as I want to eat meatballs.  Everything in this recipe can be picked up at any old grocery store. Everyday Meatballs and Sauce | Cravings & Crumbs The other thing I did to make this recipe more accessible was to cook them in the oven instead of on the stovetop.  Frying meatballs in a pan is messy and you always have to do them in batches.  By switching to the oven we can cook all our meatballs at once, which frees us up to tend to our sauce, cook the spaghetti, or make the side salad.    Everyday Meatballs and Sauce | Cravings & Crumbs You don’t have to have them with spaghetti though!  (I’ll wait for the Italians to finish rolling their eyes at me…if they’re still even reading!  They already have their own recipe for meatballs.)  My favorite way to eat these is with homemade sauce and a bunch of crusty bread to soak it all up with.   Don’t be intimidated by the homemade sauce.  It doesn’t have to be some sort of all day marathon cooking session to get a good homemade sauce.  I take a cue from Marcella Hazan and just simmer canned tomatoes for about 45 minutes.  I add garlic, onion, and oregano, as well as some red wine to give the sauce more complexity.  Once you make sauce this way you may never buy a jarred sauce again.  I always come back to this method because the sauce tastes brighter and fresher and isn’t as sweet as the premade stuff.  Oh yeah, and while we’re at it, let’s just make our own garlic bread.  My standard recipe for that will be coming next!

Everyday Meatballs and Sauce
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For the meatballs
  1. 1 c. panko bread crumbs
  2. ¼ c. milk
  3. ¼ c. minced yellow onion
  4. 5 large cloves garlic, minced
  5. ¼ c. chopped parsley
  6. ½ t. dried oregano
  7. ½ t. crushed red pepper flakes
  8. 1 t. ground black pepper
  9. 2 t. kosher salt
  10. 1 lb ground beef
  11. 1 lb mild italian sausage
  12. 2 eggs
For the sauce
  1. 2 - 28 oz. cans crushed tomatoes
  2. 4 T. butter
  3. 7 cloves garlic, minced
  4. 1 c. earthy red wine (such as merlot or cabernet sauvignon)
  5. ½ yellow onion, sliced through the root end
  6. 1 t. kosher salt
  7. 1 t. dried oregano
To make the sauce
  1. In a saucepot over medium low heat, melt the butter. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, until fragrant and slightly softened. You don’t want the garlic to brown, just to infuse the butter with its flavor.
  2. Add the tomatoes, wine, onion, salt, and oregano. Cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 45 minutes. Taste and adjust for salt.
To make the meatballs
  1. Preheat oven to 375° F.
  2. Add the panko and milk to a large bowl and allow to soak for about 3 minutes. Add the onion, garlic, herbs, salt and pepper and mix everything together. This ensures all the flavors get mixed evenly throughout without overworking the meat.
  3. Add the meat and eggs to the panko mixture and gently mix with your hands or a spoon. You don’t want to work the meat too much or your meatballs will end up dense.
  4. Roll into balls a little larger than a golf ball, about 2 tablespoons. Spray a rimmed baking sheet with nonstick spray and place the balls in rows, spacing them about 1 inch apart. If the meat has come up to room temperature by this point I suggest refrigerating them while the oven preheats, but it’s not necessary.
  5. Put the meatballs in the oven and bake for 20-30 mins, depending on size. An instant read thermometer inserted into the middle of a meatball should read 165° F.
  6. At this point you can briefly simmer the meatballs in the sauce, or you can serve them as is with sauce on top (and lots of parmesan, obviously!)
Notes
  1. The meatball mixture can be made up to a day ahead or frozen. I like to freeze half the mixture in a quart size ziploc pressed flat so that it will defrost quickly.
  2. You can also cook the meatballs in advance and rewarm them in the tomato sauce, as I did when I made them for this post.
  3. You can make the meatballs larger or smaller based on your preference, just be sure to adjust the cooking time. You want them fully cooked through, but not dried out.
  4. This recipe makes about 32 meatballs.
Cravings & Crumbs http://www.cravingsandcrumbs.com/
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Fancy Mushroom Toasts

Fancy Mushroom Toast | Cravings & Crumbs

I have a sort of foodie friend in the office I work in.  We chat about recipes we’ve tried, new ingredients we found, what we’re going to cook over the weekend, cookbooks, pretty much anything food related.  I love finding people who love to cook because talking to them gets me excited about new flavors, cuisines, and ingredients that I might not have been familiar with or known about before.

Fancy Mushroom Toast | Cravings & Crumbs

A few weeks ago he came into the office on Monday morning talking about a meal he had at Gjelina over the weekend.  He led with the dessert heavenly butterscotch pots de creme then he moved on to the mushroom toast.  I have no idea what else he ate there because we couldn’t move past the mushrooms.  Oh my god, the mushroom toast.  The chef says he can’t take these off the menu because the customers will revolt.  They’re that good.

Fancy Mushroom Toast | Cravings & Crumbs

Like any obsessive home cook, he had already bought the cookbook and was ready to try to recreate them at home.  I wouldn’t have thought much more about these mushroom toasts except to ask for a follow-up the next week.  But the next week he hadn’t made them.  The week after that he bought a mixture of fancy mushrooms at the farmer’s market, but was stymied by the homemade creme fraiche, which had to be cultured at exactly 78° F…  Three weeks I waited for the report on the mushrooms toasts!  And in the meantime I found myself reading blog posts of people who had recreated them and scrolling through instagram shots from the restaurant just to see what they looked like in their natural habitat.  Yeah, I know I have problems.

Fancy Mushroom Toast | Cravings & Crumbs

Eventually i had to take matters into my own hands.  A quick trip to my local produce market to pick up mushrooms and good bread and a jaunt over to Trader Joe’s for reasonably priced creme fraiche and I was ready!  I was out of garlic confit, although I have a recipe for my version right over here, but I wasn’t going to let that stop me.  I quickly infused some garlic in oil, used that to toast the breads.  You can toast them in the toaster, but for this recipe it’s much better on the stovetop (or grill, as the original recipe calls for) because the outside will be incredibly crunchy, but the inside of the slices will still be moist and springy.  A quick saute of the mushrooms, reduction of some white wine and shallots, and the addition of some creme fraiche and I was eating the best lunch I could ask for!

Fancy Mushroom Toast | Cravings & Crumbs

The recipe notes say that the chef enjoys a big slab of mushroom toast with an earthy glass of red wine for dinner and I must say he’s on to something.  Normally you might match the wine to whatever type of wine you used in the dish, but here the earthy meatiness of the mushrooms is perfect with red.  This is a decadent and delicious vegetarian appetizer or main course that I would be more than happy to eat again and again.

So here it is, a doable version of the original.  Although homemade garlic confit and homemade buttermilk creme fraiche would undoubtedly be amazing with this recipe, if they’re holding you back from making this recipe then don’t do them!  If you do want to go the extra mile, you can find the original recipe in full here.

Fancy Mushroom Toasts
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Ingredients
  1. ⅓ c. olive oil
  2. 5 large cloves garlic, peeled and sliced
  3. 2-4 slices good bread (depending on size)
  4. ½ lb mushrooms (see notes)
  5. Salt and pepper
  6. 2 T minced shallots
  7. 1 T butter (optional)
  8. ½ c. dry white wine
  9. 1T fresh thyme
  10. ½ c. creme fraiche
  11. 2 T fresh parsley, chopped
Instructions
  1. Add the olive oil and garlic slices to a small frying pan over medium-low heat. Cook until garlic slices are beginning to brown on the edges, then remove with a slotted spoon and save for later. Remove oil from heat.
  2. Use a pastry brush to brush a thin layer of garlic oil on both sides of the bread. Heat a frying pan over medium heat for 10 minutes, then add the bread in a single layer. Cook until the bread is crispy and browned on the first side, then flip and cook the second side in the same manner. Remove the toasts to a plate.
  3. Separate or chop mushrooms into bite-sized pieces. This will mean different things based on which mushrooms you have so use your best judgment of what size mushroom chunks will fit nicely on your toast. Turn the heat under the frying pan to medium high and add 3 T of the garlic olive oil to the frying pan. Add mushrooms, season with salt and pepper, and cook undisturbed until seared and well browned, about 5 minutes. Stir the mushrooms, add the shallots and the butter if the pan seems like it needs more moisture. Cook for 1-2 minutes, then add the wine, thyme, and reserved garlic slices and continue to cook until reduced by half.
  4. Stir in the creme fraiche and cook until thickened slightly, 1-2 mins. Stir in the parsley, taste and season again with salt and pepper, then spoon the mushrooms evenly over your toasts.
Notes
  1. Although these are fancy mushroom toasts, you should feel free to use any mushrooms that you have access to or can afford. I really know nothing about fancy mushrooms so I picked these based on looks and price and ended up with oyster and brown clamshell. The original recipe suggests a mix of nameko, hen of the woods, chanterelle, porcini, or matsutake. However, the mushrooms share the spotlight with the sauce and toast and as I was eating these I thought they would be just as delicious with regular old sliced crimini.
Adapted from Gjelina
Adapted from Gjelina
Cravings & Crumbs http://www.cravingsandcrumbs.com/
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Sausage Sandwiches with Chimichurri, Caramelized Onions, and Radicchio

Sausage Sandwiches with Chimichurri, Caramelized Onions, and Radicchio

Since as you may know, *ahem* I love to cook, it shouldn’t come as any surprise that I can easily whip up a full dinner on a weeknight for myself and whoever I’m with.  And when I say dinner I mean a main course, vegetable, and starch side because to me, making a pasta dish for dinner is like taking a break.  But sometimes it’s good to take it easy, especially when that comes in the form of sausage sandwiches with chimichurri, caramelized onions, and shredded radicchio.  Originally I was going for an Argentinian choripan vibe here, but I don’t think they’d appreciate me putting caramelized onions and radicchio on there so we’ll just call them sausage sandwiches. Read More

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Fresh Masa Empanadas

Fresh Masa Empanadas | Cravings & Crumbs

These fresh masa empanadas have been hanging out on my list of recipes to post for far too long.  I made them on a rainy day back in March and they were so delicious that three of us devoured the entire batch before dinner time, yet  for various reasons they haven’t made it onto the blog until now.  Either I had just posted a Mexican recipe (if you can’t tell by now, I like Mexican food a lot), or the weather was too hot, or I had cooked something else that I was just so excited about that I couldn’t wait to post it.  But really, those excuses aren’t any good because there is no bad time to have freshly fried empanadas. Read More

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Sambal Chicken Skewers

Sambal Chicken Skewers | Cravings & Crumbs

These sambal chicken skewers are somewhat of a triple threat – spicy, sweet, and satisfying.  Yeah, I know I’m corny, but it’s true!  These skewers were originally published in Bon Appétit in 2013 and they’ve become a favorite of tons of people for good reason!  The marinade is salty, spicy, sweet, and complex, and better yet it takes less than 10 minutes to put together.  That’s what I love about cooking asian cuisines – many of them rely on condiments that are often fermented or a mix of many different ingredients so that you can get deep, layered flavors with nearly instant gratification. Read More

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Black Bean Tostadas with Chipotle Crema

Black Bean Tostadas with Chipotle Crema

It’s Thursday which means you’ve made it over the hump and are sailing towards the weekend.  It also means you’re still two days away from leisurely cooking and cocktail hours – enter this ridiculously fast, cheap, vegetarian dinner to sustain you until you reach weekend indulgence.

Black Bean Tostadas with Chipotle Crema

These tostadas are simple, but still so satisfying.  They start with shallow fried corn tortillas (you can bake them if you prefer, they’ll just be a little bit drier), then you top them with refried black beans, a cilantro and lime slaw, cotija cheese, and a chipotle crema.  They are all at once crunchy, creamy, salty, refreshing, and satisfying.  Trust me – they seem basic, but you’re going to love them. Read More

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Achiote Chicken Salad

Achiote Chicken Salad | Cravings & Crumbs

Lunch options near my work are slim.  Don’t get me wrong, there are a lot of restaurants, but they’re all too expensive and not even that delicious.  As someone who likes to cook a lot, it pains me to pay too much money for something that I could have made better for half the price.

Achiote Chicken Salad | Cravings & Crumbs

There are a few options I enjoy when I’m too lazy to cook lunch or simply forget.  One of them is a mexican restaurant run as an offshoot to another two well known restaurants in the area.  Everything tastes really good, but you end up paying $15 for three tacos and a drink.  It kills me that I could go to the mexican market and buy everything to make enough tacos and drinks for 10 people for that price. Read More

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