Ginger Miso Skirt Steak with Brussels Sprout Slaw

Ginger Miso Steak with Brussels Sprout Slaw | Cravings & Crumbs

I don’t know about you guys, but I am fall flavor-ed out.  Sure, the sage, apple cider, cinnamon, and multiple batches of pumpkin bread were fun at first.  But after a while the flavors become monotonous, one dish blending into another on the Thanksgiving plate.  What I really wanted after that big feast was 1) beef, because after three days of Thanksgiving leftovers I don’t want another bite of poultry, and 2) something relatively healthy and preferably packed with veggies that haven’t seen any butter or cream.  Enter, this ginger miso skirt steak with a brussels sprout slaw.

Ginger Miso Steak with Brussels Sprout Slaw | Cravings & Crumbs

The steak is literally packed with flavor!  We start with miso and soy sauce for umami.  Red miso is more intense than yellow or white miso – we need the miso to be intense enough to stand up to the steak and the rest of our seasonings.  Then we grate a bunch of fresh ginger and garlic with some toasted sesame oil to pump up the flavor even more.  Lastly we add a big squirt of sriracha for some heat and a little honey for sweetness.

Ginger Miso Steak with Brussels Sprout Slaw | Cravings & Crumbs

The slaw is crunchy and fresh and a perfect complement to the steak.  If you’ve never had shredded Brussels sprouts, you’re missing out.  They have all the good qualities that cabbage has, but they have a lower water content which means that they won’t release a lot of water and dilute your dressing and they’ll stay crunchy longer!  

Ginger Miso Steak with Brussels Sprout Slaw | Cravings & Crumbs

Pro tip: if you have any leftovers or you can’t go a meal without carbs they’re really delicious chopped up in a taco!

Ginger Miso Steak with Brussels Sprout Slaw
Serves 4
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Steak
  1. 1 lb skirt steak, cut into 4 portions
  2. ⅓ c. light soy sauce
  3. 2 ½ T. red miso paste
  4. 1 T. toasted sesame oil
  5. 1 T. honey
  6. 1 T. sriracha
  7. 3 T. water
  8. 1 T. fresh ginger, grated
  9. 5 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
  10. peanut or other neutral oil to cook
Slaw
  1. 1 lb brussels sprouts (4 c. shredded)
  2. 1 c. cherry tomatoes, halved
  3. 1 medium carrot, shaved into ribbons
  4. 1 avocado, diced
  5. 1 serrano pepper, thinly sliced
  6. ¼ medium red onion, thinly sliced
  7. ½ c. cilantro, chopped
  8. 2 T. light soy sauce
  9. 2 T. rice wine vinegar
  10. 2 t. lime juice
  11. 1 t. honey
  12. 1 t. fresh ginger, minced
Instructions
  1. Mix all ingredients for the marinade in a small bowl or measuring cup. Add marinade and steak to a zip-top bag and allow to marinate for at least 30 minutes or up to overnight.
  2. In a large bowl add the shredded brussels sprouts, tomatoes, carrot, avocado, pepper, onion, and cilantro and toss to combine.
  3. In a small bowl combine the ingredients for the slaw dressing.
  4. Remove steak from marinade and pat mostly dry with paper towels.
  5. Heat a grill pan (or a real grill!) over high heat. Add 1-2 T oil to pan and add steak pieces in a single layer. Allow to sear without moving for 3-5 minutes per side for medium rare to medium.
  6. Remove to a plate and allow to rest for 5-10 mins.
  7. While steak is resting toss the slaw with the vinaigrette.
  8. Slice steak thinly against the grain and serve with slaw.
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Everyday Meatballs and Sauce

Everyday Meatballs and Sauce | Cravings & Crumbs After suffering through the final late-October heat wave of summer, we finally have a fall chill in the air and it has me dreaming of comfort food!  Aside from a perfectly roast chicken there’s nothing more comforting to me than a big bowl of tender meatballs in tomato sauce.  It wasn’t always that way though.  As a kid I was pretty indifferent to meatballs.  I liked them, but I wouldn’t go out of my way to request them.  No, like most things, I started liking them best once I made them for myself and got to research and tweak the recipe to get them exactly how I wanted. Everyday Meatballs and Sauce | Cravings & Crumbs It was a meatball starter at a local restaurant that spurred my current meatball obsession.  Made with high quality ingredients and cooked in a wood burning oven they were amazing!  And so I started trying to figure out how to get as close as possible to those meatballs at home, but I also wanted them to be something that was easy and accessible to make so it would be realistic even for a weeknight.  That meant no wood burning oven, no deep frying, and no veal.  Although many recipes use veal and surely it would make the meatballs softer, including veal in my go-to recipe would mean making a stop at a specialty market which just isn’t going to happen as often as I want to eat meatballs.  Everything in this recipe can be picked up at any old grocery store. Everyday Meatballs and Sauce | Cravings & Crumbs The other thing I did to make this recipe more accessible was to cook them in the oven instead of on the stovetop.  Frying meatballs in a pan is messy and you always have to do them in batches.  By switching to the oven we can cook all our meatballs at once, which frees us up to tend to our sauce, cook the spaghetti, or make the side salad.    Everyday Meatballs and Sauce | Cravings & Crumbs You don’t have to have them with spaghetti though!  (I’ll wait for the Italians to finish rolling their eyes at me…if they’re still even reading!  They already have their own recipe for meatballs.)  My favorite way to eat these is with homemade sauce and a bunch of crusty bread to soak it all up with.   Don’t be intimidated by the homemade sauce.  It doesn’t have to be some sort of all day marathon cooking session to get a good homemade sauce.  I take a cue from Marcella Hazan and just simmer canned tomatoes for about 45 minutes.  I add garlic, onion, and oregano, as well as some red wine to give the sauce more complexity.  Once you make sauce this way you may never buy a jarred sauce again.  I always come back to this method because the sauce tastes brighter and fresher and isn’t as sweet as the premade stuff.  Oh yeah, and while we’re at it, let’s just make our own garlic bread.  My standard recipe for that will be coming next!

Everyday Meatballs and Sauce
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For the meatballs
  1. 1 c. panko bread crumbs
  2. ¼ c. milk
  3. ¼ c. minced yellow onion
  4. 5 large cloves garlic, minced
  5. ¼ c. chopped parsley
  6. ½ t. dried oregano
  7. ½ t. crushed red pepper flakes
  8. 1 t. ground black pepper
  9. 2 t. kosher salt
  10. 1 lb ground beef
  11. 1 lb mild italian sausage
  12. 2 eggs
For the sauce
  1. 2 - 28 oz. cans crushed tomatoes
  2. 4 T. butter
  3. 7 cloves garlic, minced
  4. 1 c. earthy red wine (such as merlot or cabernet sauvignon)
  5. ½ yellow onion, sliced through the root end
  6. 1 t. kosher salt
  7. 1 t. dried oregano
To make the sauce
  1. In a saucepot over medium low heat, melt the butter. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, until fragrant and slightly softened. You don’t want the garlic to brown, just to infuse the butter with its flavor.
  2. Add the tomatoes, wine, onion, salt, and oregano. Cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 45 minutes. Taste and adjust for salt.
To make the meatballs
  1. Preheat oven to 375° F.
  2. Add the panko and milk to a large bowl and allow to soak for about 3 minutes. Add the onion, garlic, herbs, salt and pepper and mix everything together. This ensures all the flavors get mixed evenly throughout without overworking the meat.
  3. Add the meat and eggs to the panko mixture and gently mix with your hands or a spoon. You don’t want to work the meat too much or your meatballs will end up dense.
  4. Roll into balls a little larger than a golf ball, about 2 tablespoons. Spray a rimmed baking sheet with nonstick spray and place the balls in rows, spacing them about 1 inch apart. If the meat has come up to room temperature by this point I suggest refrigerating them while the oven preheats, but it’s not necessary.
  5. Put the meatballs in the oven and bake for 20-30 mins, depending on size. An instant read thermometer inserted into the middle of a meatball should read 165° F.
  6. At this point you can briefly simmer the meatballs in the sauce, or you can serve them as is with sauce on top (and lots of parmesan, obviously!)
Notes
  1. The meatball mixture can be made up to a day ahead or frozen. I like to freeze half the mixture in a quart size ziploc pressed flat so that it will defrost quickly.
  2. You can also cook the meatballs in advance and rewarm them in the tomato sauce, as I did when I made them for this post.
  3. You can make the meatballs larger or smaller based on your preference, just be sure to adjust the cooking time. You want them fully cooked through, but not dried out.
  4. This recipe makes about 32 meatballs.
Cravings & Crumbs http://www.cravingsandcrumbs.com/
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Steak Roll-Ups, A Template

Steak Roll Ups | Cravings & Crumbs

I know everybody likes to laud casseroles and stir fries as the perfect way to use up kitchen scraps, but I’d like to add steak roll-ups to that list as well.  With some leftover ingredients and a little bit of creativity you can have a dish worthy of guests and no one needs to know you threw it together with what you found in the bottom of your produce drawer. Read More

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Ribeye Lettuce Wraps with Salsa Criolla

Ribeye Lettuce Wraps | Cravings & Crumbs

With all the summer fun I’ve been having this year I’ve missed a few more weeks of posting here than I’d like.  After two years of saving up my vacation days, I told myself to say yes to any opportunities that came my way and to follow through on promises to visit friends that I’ve been putting off for years.  A partially off-the-grid trip to the mountains in Lassen County, followed by a girls getaway weekend to Pismo Beach has left me feeling relaxed and fulfilled in life, but definitely left this blog by the wayside.  So, before I jet off to New York to visit one of my oldest friends tomorrow I leave you with these grilled ribeye lettuce wraps with salsa criolla. Read More

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Lomo Saltado

Lomo Saltado

On paper Peruvian cuisine is confusing.  The Incas cultivated potatoes, quinoa, and dried beef (yes, beef jerky); the Spanish brought olives and rice; Africans made frying foods more popular;  Chinese immigrants brought soy sauce, ginger, and stir-frying methods; Italians brought pasta…the list goes on.  What you end up with are dishes like aji de gallina (a creamy chicken stew made with walnuts, hard boiled eggs and black olives), tallarines verde (spaghetti with a pesto sauce made with basil, spinach, and queso fresco) with a side of pollo saltado (a chinese chicken stir fry dish), and of course Lomo Saltado, a beef stir fry with french fries mixed in.

Lomo Saltado

Like I said, these dishes don’t sound cohesive, but there’s just something about Peruvian food, that however strange the dishes sound on the menu, once you take the first bite you’re blown away.  Somehow the flavors just work together, as if you took your favorite elements from each cuisine and mashed them up into something amazing.   Read More

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Spiced Pita Burgers with Garlic Yogurt Sauce

Spiced Pita Burgers

Ah, finally, something on this blog that can actually be called dinner…

These pita burgers are absolutely delicious and a perfectly unambitious weeknight dinner with flavor that will make people think you worked hard.  With essentially 4 steps (mix the meat, mix the sauce, stuff the pitas, and cook) you can pull this one off in about 40 minutes or less if you play your cards right. The best part, though?  You can make these ahead through any step and save them for later.  You can mix the meat and/or the sauce the night before and stuff and cook when you get home from work the next day.  These even reheat really well in the toaster oven so you could make the whole recipe ahead and heat them up later. Read More

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