Gremolata Mushroom Pasta

Gremolata Mushroom Pasta | Cravings & Crumbs

I’m at that point in the year when vegetables just don’t sound good to me.  Sure, I want to eat tons of vegetables, my body is asking me to eat vegetables, but when I walk through the produce aisle at the store nothing calls out to me or gets me excited.  Except mushrooms.  Mushrooms and broccoli are my saving grace in winter.  

Gremolata Mushroom Pasta | Cravings & Crumbs

I’ve been cooking them all sorts of ways, but recently I was thumbing through Joshua McFadden’s new book, Six Seasons, and as I was flipping through the pages the heavens parted, birds started chirping, and there they were, these gremolata mushrooms.  Good ‘ol mushrooms.  

Gremolata Mushroom Pasta | Cravings & Crumbs

Sure, I felt a little lame that in a book with so many inspiring recipes for often overlooked vegetables (think celery root, kohlrabi, rutabaga, and turnips) I went straight for the familiar.  What I’ve found about McFadden’s recipes is that even with ingredients that you’ve cooked before, he presents them to you in a whole new light.  In this dish we start by sauteeing mushrooms with garlic and olive oil.  Simple, basic.  Then we cover them with briny capers, lemon zest and juice, more garlic, and a ton of parsley.  The gremolata totally transforms the mushrooms by brightening them up and adding interest.  For me, the secret ingredient is the lemon zest.  Using zest is kind of a cheffy trick that makes a huge impact, but as a home cook I often forget about it.  Here, it really makes the dish.  

Gremolata Mushroom Pasta | Cravings & Crumbs

Last, but not least, I added pasta and a ton of parmesan because its winter and I need to plump myself up to stay warm!  Adding pasta rounds out the dish and turns it into a full meal.  Next time you’re craving a satisfying meatless meal, or just want a freakin’ delicious mushroom pasta recipe, look no further!

Gremolata Mushroom Pasta | Cravings & Crumbs

Gremolata Mushroom Pasta
Serves 4
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Ingredients
  1. 3 T olive oil + a little more
  2. 4 cloves garlic, minced
  3. 2 whole cloves garlic, peeled
  4. 1 T capers, chopped
  5. Juice and zest of 1 lemon
  6. ½ c. flat leaf parsley
  7. Salt and pepper
  8. 1 lb mushrooms (crimini or fancier, whatever you feel like)
  9. ½ lb cavatappi or other similar pasta
  10. Grated parmesan
Instructions
  1. Add capers, lemon zest and juice to a small bowl.
  2. Heat 3 T olive oil in a pan over medium heat. Add minced garlic and cook until fragrant, but not browned at all, about 1 minute.
  3. Pour the hot garlic oil into the bowl with the lemon and capers. Add ¾ of the parsley, season with salt and pepper and set aside.
  4. Chop the mushrooms into large pieces. Heat a little more olive oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Use the flat side of a large knife to whack/smash remaining garlic cloves. Add the garlic and mushrooms to the frying pan and season with salt and pepper. Saute, stirring occasionally, until mushrooms are browned and crispy on the edges, 12-15 mins, adding more oil as needed.
  5. Meanwhile, cook pasta according to package directions. Drain, but don’t rinse.
  6. Add pasta, mushrooms, and gremolata and stir to combine.Top with remaining parsley and as much parmesan as you want.
Adapted from Joshua McFadden
Adapted from Joshua McFadden
Cravings & Crumbs http://www.cravingsandcrumbs.com/
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Fried Chicken and Cornmeal Chive Waffles with Maple Creme Fraiche

Fried Chicken and Cornmeal Chive Waffles with Maple Creme Fraiche | Cravings & Crumbs

A year ago I put this blog live.  I had no idea what I was doing (still barely do) – all I knew was that I had been thinking about a food blog for long enough that I needed to just do it.  2017 threw me for a loop, but luckily this little blog kept me motivated and my mind occupied, making it the most personally gratifying year despite the hardships.  I spent almost every weekend dreaming up recipes, testing, and photographing them.  I took a photography class and upgraded my camera.  Best of all, I ate so much good food with the people closest to me and honestly, that’s really the point of it for me.  

Fried Chicken and Cornmeal Chive Waffles with Maple Creme Fraiche | Cravings & Crumbs

The only reason I know how to cook is because my dad cooked a meal from scratch seven days a week.  The other day my mom asked my brother and I why we like to cook and the answer was simple.  The only time we went to restaurants was when we were travelling, so if I wanted anything different I had to figure out how to make it myself.  If I had an idea they would help me find a recipe, shop for the ingredients, and cook it.  My mindset was fixed early that good food was easy to make and more gratifying than going out.  My brother agreed, cooking is just what we did as a family.  It’s fun for us and cooking together has become a treat as we’ve gone off and formed our own styles.  

Fried Chicken and Cornmeal Chive Waffles with Maple Creme Fraiche | Cravings & Crumbs

So, with my family life revolving around cooking, it was a no brainer that for my one-year anniversary I wanted to collaborate on a dish with my brother.  See, he’s a professional chef and knows everything from soul food to vegan eats.  We’re constantly bouncing ideas off of each other and telling each other about the new recipes we come up with.  

Fried Chicken and Cornmeal Chive Waffles with Maple Creme Fraiche | Cravings & Crumbs

There’s one recipe of his that I am always so happy when he makes and that’s his fried chicken.  His recipe is pretty classic – if there’s one dish that doesn’t need to be reinvented it’s fried chicken.  He starts with a buttermilk brine for flavor and to tenderize the meat.  Then he dredges the chicken in well seasoned flour, making sure to press the meat all around so that the coating is thick and crunchy.

Fried Chicken and Cornmeal Chive Waffles with Maple Creme Fraiche | Cravings & Crumbs

Where we threw our spin on this was in the accompaniments.  When I asked my brother to make fried chicken with me he suggested pairing it with savory waffles and a maple creme fraiche.  That was all I needed to hear!  My only suggestion was that we make the waffles yeasted because I love the depth of flavor and texture you get out of letting the batter rest overnight.  With a little bit of cornmeal in the batter, we end up with a waffle that’s crispy on the outside, light and very moist on the inside.  

Fried Chicken and Cornmeal Chive Waffles with Maple Creme Fraiche | Cravings & Crumbs

Each component is so complexly flavored that they can stand on their own, but all together the flavor combination is incredible.  The chicken is crunchy, salty, juicy, with a touch of spice.  The waffles are crisp, yet tender, with a deep flavor from the overnight rest, chives and black pepper.  Finally, the maple creme fraiche is sweet and cooling with a slight tang.  All together, this is quite a bit of work, but making them with a partner makes easy work.  I’m sure even those who don’t like to cook much will be willing to help out if this is their reward.

Here’s to cooking new dishes and eating more good food with those that we love in the new year!

Dustin's Fried Chicken with Maple Creme Fraiche
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Ingredients
  1. 1 ½ lb boneless skinless chicken thighs, cut in half lengthwise
  2. 2 c. buttermilk
  3. 1 t. fresh thyme, finely chopped
  4. 1 T. Tony Cachere’s original creole seasoning
  5. 2 T. Crystal hot sauce
  6. Neutral oil for frying
  7. 4 c. all-purpose flour
  8. 4 T. kosher salt
  9. 2 T. black pepper
  10. 2 t. cayenne pepper
  11. 7.5 oz. creme fraiche
  12. ½ c. maple syrup
Instructions
  1. Mix the buttermilk, thyme, creole seasoning, and hot sauce in a large bowl. Add chicken, turning to coat and allow to marinate at least 30 minutes, and up to one day. The longer you marinate, the juicier and more tender the chicken will be, but don’t let it go beyond a day or else the texture will start to go downhill.
  2. Begin heating oil to 375° F in a large, heavy-bottomed pot. The amount of oil will depend on your pot, but you want the oil to come up the sides at least 2”.
  3. Stir together creme fraiche and maple syrup in a bowl and set aside.
  4. In another large bowl combine the flour, salt, black pepper, and cayenne. Remove the chicken from the marinade and add to the flour. Don’t worry about letting any excess marinade drip off - we want the extra marinade drips in the flour to help build crunchy pieces. Stir and smoosh the chicken around in the flour to completely coat all the pieces and let sit for about 10 mins to help the flour adhere to the chicken.
  5. Once oil is at 375° F, drop in 2-3 pieces of chicken. (When you drop in the chicken the oil should cool down to around 350° F.) Fry for about 8-10 minutes, or until cooked through. Remove and drain on paper towels. Repeat with the remaining chicken.
  6. Serve with overnight cornmeal and chive waffles, a drizzle of maple creme fraiche, and extra hot sauce if desired.
Cravings & Crumbs http://www.cravingsandcrumbs.com/
Overnight Cornmeal and Chive Waffles
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Ingredients
  1. 1 ½ t. active dry yeast
  2. ½ c. warm water
  3. ½ c. unsalted butter, melted
  4. 2 c. milk, lukewarm
  5. 3 c. all-purpose flour
  6. ½ c. cornmeal
  7. 1 ½ t. granulated sugar
  8. 1 t. kosher salt
  9. 2 large eggs
  10. ½ t. baking soda
  11. 4 ½ t. minced chives
  12. 1 t. freshly cracked black pepper
Instructions
  1. Pour warm water into a large bowl and sprinkle yeast over the top. Let sit for 5 minutes, in which time the yeast should begin to foam.
  2. Add the melted butter, milk, flour, cornmeal, sugar, and salt and whisk thoroughly until the batter is smooth and all ingredients are incorporated. Cover with plastic wrap and allow to sit out at room temperature overnight, or at least 8 hours. Make sure the bowl is at least double the size of the batter as it will grow quite a bit.
  3. When you’re ready to make your waffles begin by preheating your waffle iron. The temperature that you preheat it to will depend in your iron, but I set mine to medium-high.
  4. Add eggs and baking soda to the batter and either whisk well of use an immersion blender to make sure everything is completely smooth and combined. Add chives and pepper and stir with a spoon.
  5. Cook according to the directions for your waffle maker, or however you normally make waffles. For me, this meant I put my waffle iron on medium high and cooked with a light spray of nonstick spray until the waffles were very well browned, 4-5 mins. This yielded a crispy waffle, so cook for less time if you prefer a softer waffle.
Notes
  1. A tip for the milk - you don’t want it hot, just warm enough that it won’t shock the butter when you mix them together. I did this by microwaving the milk in 30 second intervals until it was slightly warm to the touch.
  2. Makes 10-12 4”x5” waffle squares in my belgian waffle maker.
Cravings & Crumbs http://www.cravingsandcrumbs.com/

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Ginger Miso Skirt Steak with Brussels Sprout Slaw

Ginger Miso Steak with Brussels Sprout Slaw | Cravings & Crumbs

I don’t know about you guys, but I am fall flavor-ed out.  Sure, the sage, apple cider, cinnamon, and multiple batches of pumpkin bread were fun at first.  But after a while the flavors become monotonous, one dish blending into another on the Thanksgiving plate.  What I really wanted after that big feast was 1) beef, because after three days of Thanksgiving leftovers I don’t want another bite of poultry, and 2) something relatively healthy and preferably packed with veggies that haven’t seen any butter or cream.  Enter, this ginger miso skirt steak with a brussels sprout slaw.

Ginger Miso Steak with Brussels Sprout Slaw | Cravings & Crumbs

The steak is literally packed with flavor!  We start with miso and soy sauce for umami.  Red miso is more intense than yellow or white miso – we need the miso to be intense enough to stand up to the steak and the rest of our seasonings.  Then we grate a bunch of fresh ginger and garlic with some toasted sesame oil to pump up the flavor even more.  Lastly we add a big squirt of sriracha for some heat and a little honey for sweetness.

Ginger Miso Steak with Brussels Sprout Slaw | Cravings & Crumbs

The slaw is crunchy and fresh and a perfect complement to the steak.  If you’ve never had shredded Brussels sprouts, you’re missing out.  They have all the good qualities that cabbage has, but they have a lower water content which means that they won’t release a lot of water and dilute your dressing and they’ll stay crunchy longer!  

Ginger Miso Steak with Brussels Sprout Slaw | Cravings & Crumbs

Pro tip: if you have any leftovers or you can’t go a meal without carbs they’re really delicious chopped up in a taco!

Ginger Miso Steak with Brussels Sprout Slaw
Serves 4
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Steak
  1. 1 lb skirt steak, cut into 4 portions
  2. ⅓ c. light soy sauce
  3. 2 ½ T. red miso paste
  4. 1 T. toasted sesame oil
  5. 1 T. honey
  6. 1 T. sriracha
  7. 3 T. water
  8. 1 T. fresh ginger, grated
  9. 5 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
  10. peanut or other neutral oil to cook
Slaw
  1. 1 lb brussels sprouts (4 c. shredded)
  2. 1 c. cherry tomatoes, halved
  3. 1 medium carrot, shaved into ribbons
  4. 1 avocado, diced
  5. 1 serrano pepper, thinly sliced
  6. ¼ medium red onion, thinly sliced
  7. ½ c. cilantro, chopped
  8. 2 T. light soy sauce
  9. 2 T. rice wine vinegar
  10. 2 t. lime juice
  11. 1 t. honey
  12. 1 t. fresh ginger, minced
Instructions
  1. Mix all ingredients for the marinade in a small bowl or measuring cup. Add marinade and steak to a zip-top bag and allow to marinate for at least 30 minutes or up to overnight.
  2. In a large bowl add the shredded brussels sprouts, tomatoes, carrot, avocado, pepper, onion, and cilantro and toss to combine.
  3. In a small bowl combine the ingredients for the slaw dressing.
  4. Remove steak from marinade and pat mostly dry with paper towels.
  5. Heat a grill pan (or a real grill!) over high heat. Add 1-2 T oil to pan and add steak pieces in a single layer. Allow to sear without moving for 3-5 minutes per side for medium rare to medium.
  6. Remove to a plate and allow to rest for 5-10 mins.
  7. While steak is resting toss the slaw with the vinaigrette.
  8. Slice steak thinly against the grain and serve with slaw.
Cravings & Crumbs http://www.cravingsandcrumbs.com/
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Everyday Meatballs and Sauce

Everyday Meatballs and Sauce | Cravings & Crumbs After suffering through the final late-October heat wave of summer, we finally have a fall chill in the air and it has me dreaming of comfort food!  Aside from a perfectly roast chicken there’s nothing more comforting to me than a big bowl of tender meatballs in tomato sauce.  It wasn’t always that way though.  As a kid I was pretty indifferent to meatballs.  I liked them, but I wouldn’t go out of my way to request them.  No, like most things, I started liking them best once I made them for myself and got to research and tweak the recipe to get them exactly how I wanted. Everyday Meatballs and Sauce | Cravings & Crumbs It was a meatball starter at a local restaurant that spurred my current meatball obsession.  Made with high quality ingredients and cooked in a wood burning oven they were amazing!  And so I started trying to figure out how to get as close as possible to those meatballs at home, but I also wanted them to be something that was easy and accessible to make so it would be realistic even for a weeknight.  That meant no wood burning oven, no deep frying, and no veal.  Although many recipes use veal and surely it would make the meatballs softer, including veal in my go-to recipe would mean making a stop at a specialty market which just isn’t going to happen as often as I want to eat meatballs.  Everything in this recipe can be picked up at any old grocery store. Everyday Meatballs and Sauce | Cravings & Crumbs The other thing I did to make this recipe more accessible was to cook them in the oven instead of on the stovetop.  Frying meatballs in a pan is messy and you always have to do them in batches.  By switching to the oven we can cook all our meatballs at once, which frees us up to tend to our sauce, cook the spaghetti, or make the side salad.    Everyday Meatballs and Sauce | Cravings & Crumbs You don’t have to have them with spaghetti though!  (I’ll wait for the Italians to finish rolling their eyes at me…if they’re still even reading!  They already have their own recipe for meatballs.)  My favorite way to eat these is with homemade sauce and a bunch of crusty bread to soak it all up with.   Don’t be intimidated by the homemade sauce.  It doesn’t have to be some sort of all day marathon cooking session to get a good homemade sauce.  I take a cue from Marcella Hazan and just simmer canned tomatoes for about 45 minutes.  I add garlic, onion, and oregano, as well as some red wine to give the sauce more complexity.  Once you make sauce this way you may never buy a jarred sauce again.  I always come back to this method because the sauce tastes brighter and fresher and isn’t as sweet as the premade stuff.  Oh yeah, and while we’re at it, let’s just make our own garlic bread.  My standard recipe for that will be coming next!

Everyday Meatballs and Sauce
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For the meatballs
  1. 1 c. panko bread crumbs
  2. ¼ c. milk
  3. ¼ c. minced yellow onion
  4. 5 large cloves garlic, minced
  5. ¼ c. chopped parsley
  6. ½ t. dried oregano
  7. ½ t. crushed red pepper flakes
  8. 1 t. ground black pepper
  9. 2 t. kosher salt
  10. 1 lb ground beef
  11. 1 lb mild italian sausage
  12. 2 eggs
For the sauce
  1. 2 - 28 oz. cans crushed tomatoes
  2. 4 T. butter
  3. 7 cloves garlic, minced
  4. 1 c. earthy red wine (such as merlot or cabernet sauvignon)
  5. ½ yellow onion, sliced through the root end
  6. 1 t. kosher salt
  7. 1 t. dried oregano
To make the sauce
  1. In a saucepot over medium low heat, melt the butter. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, until fragrant and slightly softened. You don’t want the garlic to brown, just to infuse the butter with its flavor.
  2. Add the tomatoes, wine, onion, salt, and oregano. Cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 45 minutes. Taste and adjust for salt.
To make the meatballs
  1. Preheat oven to 375° F.
  2. Add the panko and milk to a large bowl and allow to soak for about 3 minutes. Add the onion, garlic, herbs, salt and pepper and mix everything together. This ensures all the flavors get mixed evenly throughout without overworking the meat.
  3. Add the meat and eggs to the panko mixture and gently mix with your hands or a spoon. You don’t want to work the meat too much or your meatballs will end up dense.
  4. Roll into balls a little larger than a golf ball, about 2 tablespoons. Spray a rimmed baking sheet with nonstick spray and place the balls in rows, spacing them about 1 inch apart. If the meat has come up to room temperature by this point I suggest refrigerating them while the oven preheats, but it’s not necessary.
  5. Put the meatballs in the oven and bake for 20-30 mins, depending on size. An instant read thermometer inserted into the middle of a meatball should read 165° F.
  6. At this point you can briefly simmer the meatballs in the sauce, or you can serve them as is with sauce on top (and lots of parmesan, obviously!)
Notes
  1. The meatball mixture can be made up to a day ahead or frozen. I like to freeze half the mixture in a quart size ziploc pressed flat so that it will defrost quickly.
  2. You can also cook the meatballs in advance and rewarm them in the tomato sauce, as I did when I made them for this post.
  3. You can make the meatballs larger or smaller based on your preference, just be sure to adjust the cooking time. You want them fully cooked through, but not dried out.
  4. This recipe makes about 32 meatballs.
Cravings & Crumbs http://www.cravingsandcrumbs.com/
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Fancy Mushroom Toasts

Fancy Mushroom Toast | Cravings & Crumbs

I have a sort of foodie friend in the office I work in.  We chat about recipes we’ve tried, new ingredients we found, what we’re going to cook over the weekend, cookbooks, pretty much anything food related.  I love finding people who love to cook because talking to them gets me excited about new flavors, cuisines, and ingredients that I might not have been familiar with or known about before.

Fancy Mushroom Toast | Cravings & Crumbs

A few weeks ago he came into the office on Monday morning talking about a meal he had at Gjelina over the weekend.  He led with the dessert heavenly butterscotch pots de creme then he moved on to the mushroom toast.  I have no idea what else he ate there because we couldn’t move past the mushrooms.  Oh my god, the mushroom toast.  The chef says he can’t take these off the menu because the customers will revolt.  They’re that good.

Fancy Mushroom Toast | Cravings & Crumbs

Like any obsessive home cook, he had already bought the cookbook and was ready to try to recreate them at home.  I wouldn’t have thought much more about these mushroom toasts except to ask for a follow-up the next week.  But the next week he hadn’t made them.  The week after that he bought a mixture of fancy mushrooms at the farmer’s market, but was stymied by the homemade creme fraiche, which had to be cultured at exactly 78° F…  Three weeks I waited for the report on the mushrooms toasts!  And in the meantime I found myself reading blog posts of people who had recreated them and scrolling through instagram shots from the restaurant just to see what they looked like in their natural habitat.  Yeah, I know I have problems.

Fancy Mushroom Toast | Cravings & Crumbs

Eventually i had to take matters into my own hands.  A quick trip to my local produce market to pick up mushrooms and good bread and a jaunt over to Trader Joe’s for reasonably priced creme fraiche and I was ready!  I was out of garlic confit, although I have a recipe for my version right over here, but I wasn’t going to let that stop me.  I quickly infused some garlic in oil, used that to toast the breads.  You can toast them in the toaster, but for this recipe it’s much better on the stovetop (or grill, as the original recipe calls for) because the outside will be incredibly crunchy, but the inside of the slices will still be moist and springy.  A quick saute of the mushrooms, reduction of some white wine and shallots, and the addition of some creme fraiche and I was eating the best lunch I could ask for!

Fancy Mushroom Toast | Cravings & Crumbs

The recipe notes say that the chef enjoys a big slab of mushroom toast with an earthy glass of red wine for dinner and I must say he’s on to something.  Normally you might match the wine to whatever type of wine you used in the dish, but here the earthy meatiness of the mushrooms is perfect with red.  This is a decadent and delicious vegetarian appetizer or main course that I would be more than happy to eat again and again.

So here it is, a doable version of the original.  Although homemade garlic confit and homemade buttermilk creme fraiche would undoubtedly be amazing with this recipe, if they’re holding you back from making this recipe then don’t do them!  If you do want to go the extra mile, you can find the original recipe in full here.

Fancy Mushroom Toasts
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Ingredients
  1. ⅓ c. olive oil
  2. 5 large cloves garlic, peeled and sliced
  3. 2-4 slices good bread (depending on size)
  4. ½ lb mushrooms (see notes)
  5. Salt and pepper
  6. 2 T minced shallots
  7. 1 T butter (optional)
  8. ½ c. dry white wine
  9. 1T fresh thyme
  10. ½ c. creme fraiche
  11. 2 T fresh parsley, chopped
Instructions
  1. Add the olive oil and garlic slices to a small frying pan over medium-low heat. Cook until garlic slices are beginning to brown on the edges, then remove with a slotted spoon and save for later. Remove oil from heat.
  2. Use a pastry brush to brush a thin layer of garlic oil on both sides of the bread. Heat a frying pan over medium heat for 10 minutes, then add the bread in a single layer. Cook until the bread is crispy and browned on the first side, then flip and cook the second side in the same manner. Remove the toasts to a plate.
  3. Separate or chop mushrooms into bite-sized pieces. This will mean different things based on which mushrooms you have so use your best judgment of what size mushroom chunks will fit nicely on your toast. Turn the heat under the frying pan to medium high and add 3 T of the garlic olive oil to the frying pan. Add mushrooms, season with salt and pepper, and cook undisturbed until seared and well browned, about 5 minutes. Stir the mushrooms, add the shallots and the butter if the pan seems like it needs more moisture. Cook for 1-2 minutes, then add the wine, thyme, and reserved garlic slices and continue to cook until reduced by half.
  4. Stir in the creme fraiche and cook until thickened slightly, 1-2 mins. Stir in the parsley, taste and season again with salt and pepper, then spoon the mushrooms evenly over your toasts.
Notes
  1. Although these are fancy mushroom toasts, you should feel free to use any mushrooms that you have access to or can afford. I really know nothing about fancy mushrooms so I picked these based on looks and price and ended up with oyster and brown clamshell. The original recipe suggests a mix of nameko, hen of the woods, chanterelle, porcini, or matsutake. However, the mushrooms share the spotlight with the sauce and toast and as I was eating these I thought they would be just as delicious with regular old sliced crimini.
Adapted from Gjelina
Adapted from Gjelina
Cravings & Crumbs http://www.cravingsandcrumbs.com/
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Steak Roll-Ups, A Template

Steak Roll Ups | Cravings & Crumbs

I know everybody likes to laud casseroles and stir fries as the perfect way to use up kitchen scraps, but I’d like to add steak roll-ups to that list as well.  With some leftover ingredients and a little bit of creativity you can have a dish worthy of guests and no one needs to know you threw it together with what you found in the bottom of your produce drawer. Read More

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Sausage Sandwiches with Chimichurri, Caramelized Onions, and Radicchio

Sausage Sandwiches with Chimichurri, Caramelized Onions, and Radicchio

Since as you may know, *ahem* I love to cook, it shouldn’t come as any surprise that I can easily whip up a full dinner on a weeknight for myself and whoever I’m with.  And when I say dinner I mean a main course, vegetable, and starch side because to me, making a pasta dish for dinner is like taking a break.  But sometimes it’s good to take it easy, especially when that comes in the form of sausage sandwiches with chimichurri, caramelized onions, and shredded radicchio.  Originally I was going for an Argentinian choripan vibe here, but I don’t think they’d appreciate me putting caramelized onions and radicchio on there so we’ll just call them sausage sandwiches. Read More

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Fresh Masa Empanadas

Fresh Masa Empanadas | Cravings & Crumbs

These fresh masa empanadas have been hanging out on my list of recipes to post for far too long.  I made them on a rainy day back in March and they were so delicious that three of us devoured the entire batch before dinner time, yet  for various reasons they haven’t made it onto the blog until now.  Either I had just posted a Mexican recipe (if you can’t tell by now, I like Mexican food a lot), or the weather was too hot, or I had cooked something else that I was just so excited about that I couldn’t wait to post it.  But really, those excuses aren’t any good because there is no bad time to have freshly fried empanadas. Read More

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Ribeye Lettuce Wraps with Salsa Criolla

Ribeye Lettuce Wraps | Cravings & Crumbs

With all the summer fun I’ve been having this year I’ve missed a few more weeks of posting here than I’d like.  After two years of saving up my vacation days, I told myself to say yes to any opportunities that came my way and to follow through on promises to visit friends that I’ve been putting off for years.  A partially off-the-grid trip to the mountains in Lassen County, followed by a girls getaway weekend to Pismo Beach has left me feeling relaxed and fulfilled in life, but definitely left this blog by the wayside.  So, before I jet off to New York to visit one of my oldest friends tomorrow I leave you with these grilled ribeye lettuce wraps with salsa criolla. Read More

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BBQ Chicken Salad with Creamy Poblano Dressing

BBQ Chicken Salad with Creamy Poblano Dressing

I have a thing for summer food.  What do I mean by “a thing”?  Well soups, stews, and roasts are great, but what I really want year round is to be able to eat something light, flavorful, and that hopefully was grilled outside.  This summer salad hits all the marks. Read More

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